Alert

About Monkeypox

Monkeypox is a disease caused by a viral zoonotic disease, meaning that it can spread from animals to humans. It can also spread between people.

The disease is called monkeypox because it was first identified in colonies of monkeys kept for research in 1958. It was only later detected in humans in 1970.

However, it does not spread easily among people and most people recover within a few weeks.

All age categories can be infected, in most cases, the symptoms of monkeypox go away on their own within a few weeks, but in some individuals, it can lead to medical complications.

Newborns, children and people with underlying immune deficiencies may be at risk of more serious symptoms.

Monkeypox virus is mostly transmitted to people from wild animals through direct contact with blood, body fluids, cutaneous or mucosal lesions of an infected animal or eating insufficiently cooked meat of an infected animal.

You can catch monkeypox through close physical contact with someone who has symptoms. The rash, bodily fluids (such as fluid, pus or blood from skin lesions).

The virus can also spread from someone who is pregnant to the fetus from the placenta, or from an infected parent to child during or after birth through skin-to-skin contact.


■ If you think you have symptoms or have been a close contact of someone with monkeypox:

  • In case you experience any symptoms, you can visit the nearest health facility under EHS. (Primary Health Care Centers and Hospitals) or call 8008877 for more information.
  • If possible, self-isolate and avoid close contact with others.
  • Clean hands regularly and take the steps listed above to protect others from infection.

Protection Against Monkeypox

  • Avoid contact with people who have suspected or confirmed monkeypox cases.
  • Avoid contact with alive or dead infected animals or objects that have been in contact with an sick animal.
  • Regularly clean your hands with soap and water or an alcohol-based hand rub, especially after contact with the person who is infected, their clothes, bed sheets, towels and other items or surfaces they have touched or that might have come into contact with their rash or respiratory secretions (e.g., utensils, dishes).
  • You should both wear a medical mask, especially if they are coughing or have lesions in their mouth.
  • If you do need to have physical contact with someone who has monkeypox because you are a health worker or live together, encourage the infected person to self-isolate and cover any skin lesion if they can (e.g., by wearing clothing over the rash).
  • Wash the infected person’s clothes, towels and bedsheets and eating utensils with warm water and detergent. Clean and disinfect any contaminated surfaces and dispose of contaminated waste (e.g., dressings) appropriately.
  • Cook meat properly before eating

Infection

The interval from the infection to the onset of symptoms ranges from 5 to 21 days, while symptoms of the disease can last from 2 to 4 weeks.

People with monkeypox are infectious while they have symptoms (normally between two and four weeks).

You can catch monkeypox through close physical contact with someone who has symptoms. The rash, bodily fluids (such as fluid, pus or blood from skin lesions).

Clothing, bedding, towels or objects like eating utensils/dishes that have been contaminated with the virus from contact with an infected person can also infect others.

Ulcers, lesions or sores in the mouth can also be infectious, meaning the virus can spread through saliva.

People who closely interact with someone who is infectious, including health workers, household members and sexual partners are therefore at greater risk for infection.

The virus can also spread from someone who is pregnant to the fetus from the placenta, or from an infected parent to child during or after birth through skin-to-skin contact.

The Symptoms of Monkeypox

  • Fever
  • Muscle aches
  • Headache
  • Back pain
  • Enlarged lymph gland
  • Skin rash which usually begins within 1-3 days of fever

Symptoms typically last between two to four weeks and go away on their own without treatment. If you think you have symptoms that could be monkeypox, seek advice from your health care provider. Let them know if you have had close contact with someone who has suspected or confirmed monkeypox.

The Treatments of Monkeypox

Monkeypox symptoms often resolve on their own without the need for treatment and symptoms usually go within 2 to 4 weeks.

It is important to take care of the rash by letting it dry if possible or covering with a moist dressing to protect the area if needed.

Symptomatic supportive care is considered the current main treatment.

Frequently Asked Questions about Monkeypox

Monkeypox Infographic

Do you think this content is helpful?

Post your comments

Rate the content